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Theatre


Into the Woods Murfreesboro Center for the Arts

By Julia Larson // Contributing Writer The Murfreesboro Center for the Arts’ production of Into The Woods, directed by Renee Robinson, is running through Jan.  31. The show follows the lives of several down-on-their-luck fairytale characters as they venture into the woods to find the things they wish for the most. But of course, evil witches and …

Sara Snoddy  // Contributing writer The word “quaint” describes the stage at Murfreesboro’s Center for the Arts, and that is certainly what set designer Shane Lowry and director Bill Stewart want to project. The initial sequence of Harvey takes place in the old Dowd family mansion. The cozy set, dressed as a personal home library, holds …

Dylan Skye Aycock and John Connor Coulston contributed to this report A mile away from campus, tucked behind local businesses and busy intersections, is Murfreesboro Little Theatre, a non-profit “playhouse” that dates back more than 100 years. The cabin, adorned with a cherry red door and outlined with orange trim, once occupied a 1960s theatre, …

Murfreesboro’s Center for the Arts has released their 2015 schedule of performances and art exhibitions. This year’s productions include The Music Man, West Side Story, Bonnie & Clyde, White Christmas and the currently running Wizard of Oz. Audition dates for each production can be found at the Center’s website. Check out the full production schedule …

The Center for the Arts premiered their version of The Who’s classic rock opera Tommy last night to a packed audience. Despite the limited production value, the musical proved to be an entertaining ride highlighted by some poignant performances and faithful renditions of iconic rock anthems—the most iconic among them being the musical’s most recognizable …

The Murfreesboro Little Theatre began its run of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet on Friday evening. The production was wonderfully adapted to fit the needs of a modern audience, while still staying remarkably true to the original story and dialogue. The actors seamlessly blended classic soliloquies and speeches with hilarious delivery of Shakespeare’s original humor. The entire performance represented the tragic …